Tag Archives: #blacklivesmatter

Y’all hate Tiffany Haddish but Love Cardi because society wants Memes, not Black Lives

With the popularization of Black culture(s) and the increase of allies, I couldn’t help but notice (especially living in the Liberal bubble that is New York City), Y’all don’t really know about Black Culture(s). For many people, I think the lens they understand “Black culture” from is through the narratives of popular culture (via social media), and maybe an African American studies class they took once in college (bonus points if you minored in it). But when it actually comes to understanding Black culture(s), I still notice that most people fall short. The recent arrest of Arthur Posey, who is facing 2 charges of claiming false information of planned arson, because he expressed that he intends on “Blow the bathroom up,” goes to show that there’s a HUGE disconnect of cultural competency for Black people and our culture. Black women feel this frustration, because our bodies as where we have ideal physical features (large asses, thick lips, etc), we are literally reduced to those features.. That being said, our features are often looked down on, until White Women possess/appropriate those features.

From my perspective, this really speaks to society’s desire to capitalize on Blackness without taking the time (or interest) to really understand or appreciate it. I think this phenomenon explains why Cardi B is more accepted by society as opposed to Tiffany Haddish (obviously Colorism plays a role). Cardi B has gained her popularity in part because of talent, he ability to be relatable, and because she capitalized on being viral due to memes. Yes fam, before Cardi B was a famous rapper, she was on Love and Hip Hop and definitely gained more mainstream notability than her co-stars for her usage of facial expressions, relatable comedy, and catchphrases. Cardi B has been able to take an identity that people typically look down on, and inspire people who’ve never stepped foot in the Bronx to wish that’s where they hailed from (sorta). This being said, I highly doubt most of the suburb teens singing along to “Bodak Yellow” aspire to actually step foot in the Bronx to actually learn about Cardi’s upbringing. Cardi is only one example, however, of how non-Black people enjoy the commercialization of Black folks but don’t actually hold any interest in learning about Black people. Cause bet, If Tiffany Haddish rebranded herself to be more “meme’able,” you’d likely see a spike in her popularity and to some extent “worth” in society. 

This is not to say Tiffany Haddish isn’t worthy, she absolutely is! But when I say “worth,” I mean her value in the eyes of a society that cares more for memes/pop-culture and not Black lives. In a lot of ways, Cardi B fits exactly who people expect a Black/Latina girl from the Bronx to be like. Tiffany Haddish however, doesn’t really fit any stereotypes that non-White folks can relate to. They don’t understand her humor, nor do they aspire to. Understanding Tiffany Haddish’s comedy (or the comedy of many other Black people) involves actually knowing Black people (you must have more than one Black friend to relate) and understanding the pressures society puts on us. Racism (and I’d argue colorism) comes into play when you realize that White people (and probably many non-Black people of color) have a harder time feeling empathy for Black people than they do their own race. Cardi B may not be a White woman, but she is biracial/light skin and we see that Lighter Black woman are treated and regarded better than darker Black women. Considering the Black women that people idolize, may it be Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, Beyonce, or Cardi B, you’ll find that the common denominator is Light skin. 

When Black women are able to break into mainstream culture it’s typically because of their ability to fit into a very stereotypical idea of what it means to be a Black woman (slave roles, baby momma roles, angry Black women roles, etc). Examples of that are Tiffany Pollard and GloZell Green, who’ve both had their 5-seconds of meme-worthy fame. Noted by the blog What Whites Will Never Know:

They (GloZell Green) reinforced negative stereotypes and reinforcing what the media taught the mainstream about Black people.” 

I do acknowledge that this post is entirely based on my opinion, perhaps I am being too “sensitive” about the topic. However, my experiences as a Black woman have to lead me to this conclusion. Throughout my life, I’ve found that people’s ideas of me as a Black women are largely shaped by stereotypes, and the very thought of having to expand their perspective of my identity was considered to be ‘too much work.’ In a lot of cases I find that boys on dating apps just want to focus on my ass and ability to twerk. Schools and organizations would prefer to just order soul food and play a slave movie on Black history month. Society seems like they’d rather just prefer to say #BlackLivesMatter than actually having to understand what’s going on in our Black lives.

I am interested in hearing your opinions, what do y’all think?